Wireless Force Platform 2D

Product Code: PS-3230

Description

Building on the success of the PASport 2-Axis Force Platform, the Wireless 2-Axis Force Platform offers users the same reliable performance with enhanced durability and a convenient, wireless connection. The new design features a sturdy, glass-filled nylon platform with a sheet metal top and five force beams. Four vertical beams measure forces acting normal to the platform’s surface, while a fifth beam, attached to the movable sheet metal top, measures forces acting parallel to the platform’s surface. The platform also includes four adjustable feet that make leveling quick and easy, while ensuring a stable connection is made between the force beams and the surface below.

With its new wireless design, the Wireless 2-Axis Force Platform is easier to use than ever, providing both spacial flexibility and custom sample rates for high speed sampling over Bluetooth Low Energy (up to 10 kHz). Students can measure the force applied to each beam independently or the overall normal force acting on the platform, with measurements up to ±5,200 N. They can also measure the normal and parallel forces acting on the platform simultaneously. Applications include determining the static weight of a structure or person, measuring forces associated with the impacts of falling objects, and determining the dynamic vertical and parallel forces that arise when moving or jumping. Simply place the platform on a floor or tabletop to measure vertical force, or mount it to a wall to measure horizontal force.


Features

  • Improved ruggedized design with increased maximum force range
  • Mechanical force over-limit protection (vertical force)
  • Wide top surface for jumping and standing
  • Burst sampling option for high speed wireless data collection

Applications

  • Determine hang time by jumping from and landing on the platform
  • Use two Force Platforms to investigate Newton’s Third Law
  • Measure impulse and maximum force
  • Measure the normal force acting on a person riding an elevator
  • Use a Motion Sensor and a ball to compare the impulse and change in momentum as the ball collides with the platform

Experiment Library