I scream, you scream we all scream for ICE CREAM!! Everyone loves ice cream and kids love making it.

In this presentation we look at how you can teach some kinetic molecular theory, intermolecular forces and even heats of reaction/calorimetry while making ice cream.

This lesson has been done with grade 9 applied level classes as well as grade 11 University Prep Chemistry. It can easily be tailored for senior physics and chemistry.

Students get a chance to see how state of matter affects temperature (using the PASCO Wireless Temperature Sensor), in real time, and how adding salt to ice can drop the temperature even further even though it is changing into a liquid! We then do some simple calorimetry with different forms of food to get an idea of how much energy is stored in them.

Jason Pilot is currently the Department Head of Science at Sir Winston Churchill C&VI in Thunder Bay, ON. He has been teaching Science for 17 years. Jason focuses on the integration of technology into instruction and assessment incorporated into problem and inquiry based experiential learning.

Bryan Ouellette is an Educator, Explorer and overall technology Enthusiast who enjoys discovering strategies that allow students the opportunity to investigate various concepts through personalized learning. With over a decade of classroom experience, District Lead Positions and Provincial Committees, Bryan is committed to transforming classrooms into an environment where learning happens willingly.

Bryan takes a look at the new PASCO Wireless Weather Sensor, how it works and how it can be used in classrooms. This journey will not only take you from the windy parts of the prolonged winter in New Brunswick, but also to depths of the abilities that this new PASCO Weather Sensor can provide.

The Wireless Weather Sensor with GPS is an all-in-one instrument for monitoring environmental conditions. A built-in anemometer as well as sensing elements for temperature, humidity, pressure, light, and GPS the sensor provides up to 17 different measurements that can be used individually or simultaneously. Use the sensor in logging mode with the optional Weather Vane Accessory for long-term monitoring, or use it as a hand-held instrument to study microclimates and record ambient conditions relevant to many biological and environmental phenomena. Conduct GIS/mapping experiments using the onboard GPS sensor in conjunction with any of the other available measurements. The new map display in PASCO’s SPARKvue software provides a way for students to analyze spatial data.

 

Products shown:

Students are familiar with the concept of weather – they likely use an app to see what it’s going to be like every morning to decide what to wear. But do they know the difference between weather and climate? How can we help them understand that weather refers to local conditions over a short period of time while climate identifies atmospheric behavior over longer periods of time?

We can start by having them measure “what’s happening in your neck of the woods”. The question shouldn’t be “What is THE weather like today?” Instead it should be, “What is YOUR weather like today?”

This change in context can help them understand that weather is local. The conditions that they experience could be very different not only from what someone experiences across the country, but even from what the weather is like just a few miles away.

Using the Wireless Weather Sensor with GPS you can measure and monitor local weather conditions. Simply take it outside, connect to SPARKvue, and start collecting data.

The sensor is capable of making 17 different measurements. To keep the data collection focused, you can set up a display to make the measurements look like a dashboard for your own personal (temporary) weather station

In SPARKvue you can change the units to match the units that are reported on actual weather stations. For example, in science we typically measure temperature in degrees Celsius, but weather in the US is reported in degrees Fahrenheit. This provides a good opportunity to talk about measurement units and how they are related.

Once the students collect “their” weather data, they can check that against the forecasted weather for the area at the same time.

To get a broader perspective, students can compare “their” weather to conditions in other places at the same time. For instance, PASCO scientific is at a latitude of about 38.8 degrees north. Across the country, at about the same latitude, but a very different longitude, lies Washington, D.C.

The change in longitude, going from the West Coast to the East Coast, can mean very different weather.

Your students don’t have to travel across the country to see differences in weather. Having multiple students collect data at different areas around the school or home provides a great opportunity to analyze data and incorporate science and engineering practices into your lesson. They can analyze and interpret the data by comparing both to each other’s data from different locations around the school, and to local and remote weather station data on the same day at the same time.

Using the Wireless Weather Sensor with GPS, students can not only collect data across a range of locations but also over periods of time. Weather can change from minute-to-minute, hour-to-hour, and season-to-season. As they look at averages over longer and longer periods of time, they are really beginning to look at how the climate is changing – not just short-term weather phenomena. To appreciate the difference between weather and climate, they would need to do some additional research and look at long-term historical weather data for their area.

Next time your students ask about THE weather, use the Wireless Weather sensor to collect some data so they can collect evidence about THEIR weather.

Related Products:

Wireless Weather Sensor with GPS (PS-3209)
SPARKvue Single User License (PS-2401)

 

Six members of the AYVA Team spent last week in Roseville, California at PASCO Scientific’s headquarters.

We were excited to make new acquaintances and to reconnect with our friends from years gone by.

Representatives from more than 40 different countries had an opportunity to share success stories and receive training on PASCO’s latest products and new learning management software.

We even got a sneak peek at PASCO’s Roadmap for future development initiatives. A big shout out and thank you to our very gracious hosts at PASCO.

The handheld science learning device integrates PASCO probeware and data collection and analysis software with the new Lab Manager classroom management application

Hands-on investigation helps students understand how scientific knowledge develops, while sparking their curiosity, interest, and motivation in science. Earlier this month PASCO previewed their next generation of dataloggers for hands-on, inquiry-based science at NSTA in Atlanta.

With the SPARK LX and LXi, teachers can view, monitor, and control all student devices, while students use this fully integrated handheld for planning and carrying out investigations. The SPARK LX  and LXi seamlessly blend PASCO probeware, SPARKvue data collection and analysis software, and PASCO’s new Lab Manager classroom management application, all on one device. With superior processing power, a rugged, splash-proof case, and a full-color display, the 9.6-inch Android™ touchscreen device has been built specifically for student science collaboration. It can be used online or offline.

There are two models: the SPARK LX and the SPARK LXi.

The LX model has been designed for use with PASCO Wireless Sensors or with PASPORT Sensors plus an AirLink interface. It comes with eight virtual ports for simultaneous wireless connection.

The SPARK LXi is designed for use with PASCO Wireless or PASPORT Sensors. It includes eight virtual ports plus two PASPORT ports, as well as ports for the included Fast Response Temperature Probe and Voltage Probe.

With either model, students can collect data and share their investigations, with or without sensors, with the device’s onboard sensors.

PASCO’s new Lab Manager application is included on both models and has been designed to simplify classroom management during science investigations. It allows teachers to monitor and control all student screens, broadcast their screen for lab demos, create lab groups for data-sharing, share student group screens, and send and collect files, quizzes, and exams to and from individual students or groups.

The SPARK LX and SPARK LXi also come with PASCO SPARKvue, MatchGraph, and Spectrometry software, as well as Microsoft Office, Google Docs, and GIS software.

Additionally, teachers can download any of 500 free labs from the PASCO Digital Library.

Both models will ship in mid-June.

PASCO’s new wireless weather & environmental sensor with GPS provides for some obvious investigations such as monitoring changes in weather.  However, as this sensor measures 17 different parameters, there are almost countless ways that measurements can be used individually or in combination to explore the world.

Two of the weather sensor’s 17 measurements relate to speed – the wind speed and movement speed of the sensor itself (as provided by the GPS sensor).  Recognizing the similarity of these two measurements I was curious if the weather sensor’s GPS could be used to assess the accuracy of the weather sensor’s wind speed measurement.

GPS speed has proven to be very accurate, especially in open spaces, where there are no trees or buildings blocking satellite signals.  Therefore, using the GPS to evaluate the accuracy of the wind speed sensor is a reasonable test.

Without over thinking the experimental test, I decided to go for a quick run across our parking lot holding the sensor up in the air like a torch carrier in the Olympics (okay maybe I’m over-romanticizing) and see how the headwind I generate from my sprint correlates to the GPS Speed measurement.

Being in less than optimum shape, after a long winter hiatus from anything resembling exercise, I kept my run to about 100 M (50 M in both directions).  Looking at the satellite image below that depicts my run (each dot is a separate measurement), you’ll see that there were cars in my way requiring several strenuous leaps.

Notwithstanding the strange looks I received during my run, the test proved quite successful.  The graph below shows wind speed in green and GPS Speed in blue.  During the first half of the run the two speeds correlate very closely.  On my return however there is a significant difference which I suspect was caused by a trailing wind gust that would have the effect of reducing the headwind.

In conclusion it appears that the Weather Sensor measures wind speed fairly accurately. However, in this test the wind speed sensor is measuring headwind which is a combination of traveling speed and actual wind.  Therefore more rigorous testing would be required to make a fair assessment, with external sources of wind eliminated or at least accounted for (can you think of ways how this might be done?).

In the classroom I suspect the weather sensor will be used in many interesting ways that has little to do with weather.  In the months to follow I hope to share some more of my playful discoveries with this sensor.

Exploring Energy in Motion.
An amazing science fair project by Ryan V. of Oakville, Ontario.

If at first you don’t succeed, try-try again and this was exactly Ryan V’s attitude in completing his remarkable grade 7 science fair project on Magnetic Linear Accelerators.

The accelerator that Ryan built used a series of magnets and stationary marbles positioned in stages along a wooden track that resulted in a chain reaction with a final marble shooting off the end at an impressive speed.

Ryan was very interested in knowing the marble’s speed at various stages along the track and tried numerous techniques to take accurate measurements – however, all attempts were unsuccessful.

This is where AYVA and PASCO Scientific were able to help!  Using a PASCO Smart Gate and a Wireless Airlink Ryan was able to get the data he needed.

See the video for an excellent explanation and demonstration of how it all works.  No doubt Ryan will get an A++ for his hard work and persistence.

Products used:

Smart Gate

AirLink

Capstone

November 9-11, 2017
Delta Hotels Toronto
655 Dixon Road
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Bring on the Labs!
John Fittler
Thursday, November 9 – 9:00-10:00 am – Room TH0109

See how a small school science teacher who has to teach chemistry, physics, and biology has adapted to the current teaching technology available creating sensor-based labs.

In this interactive workshop, John will use a variety of PASCO sensors developing biology, physics, and chemistry labs.
iPads and wireless sensors will show how a teacher-led demonstration can be easily accessed by lab groups for further analysis.
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Inquiry and Devices and Probes, Oh My!
Clayton Ellis
Thursday, November 9 – 9:00-10:00am

Take a journey through a 21st Century Science Classroom. Through the use of various PASCO sensors and integration of a variety of apps, an inquiry-based classroom becomes an engaging and authentic place to collect and share data.

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A Better Tool for Helping Students Understand Electric Circuits
Rick De Benedetti
Thursday, October 9 – 2:45 – 4:00 pm – STAO Playground

Struggling with teaching basic electric circuits?
This session will demonstrate a new package of modular components that make it easier to relate what is happening in a physical circuit to what is seen in a circuit diagram.

Rick will present an introductory set of activities and materials for the Grade 9 audience, followed by discussion about the merits and difficulties related to the use of current and voltage formulas.

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Interactive: Inquiry and Devices and Probes, Oh My!
Clayton Ellis
Friday November 10 – 11:00am-12:30pm – STAO Playground

Take a journey through a 21st Century Science Classroom. Through the use of various PASCO sensors and integration of a variety of apps, an inquiry-based classroom becomes an engaging and authentic place to collect and share data.

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Promoting Science Inquiry with Wireless Sensors
Rick De Benedetti
Friday, November 10 – 11:00am-12:30pm – STAO Playground

Learn how wireless technology allows students to explore authentic learning experiences within a limited time frame. Using wireless sensors means teachers can focus on the students rather than the equipment, and students are more likely to enjoy and learn from the activities, as they feel natural and are spontaneous.
This session will demonstrate kinematics for senior physics and possible uses in Grades 9 and 10 classrooms.
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Extending Inquiry and Problem-Based Learning into the Digital Age
JASON PILOT, DOUGLAS JONES
Saturday, November 11 –  9:00-10:00am

This session will focus on a TLLP project where state of the art digital technology will be introduced into the science classrooms to enhance the already established Inquiry- and Problem-Based learning environment.

We will look at how environmentally-based case studies can be used for developing 21st century skills. An enhanced holistic understanding of Scientific Inquiry and Problem Solving is anticipated.

Update your SPARKvue software to the latest released version!


What’s new in this version

  • Improved Graph, Scope, FFT and Bar Graph displays
  • Ability to directly connect Wireless Sensors to compatible Windows devices
  • New and improved Graph tool behaviors
  • Easier to change display measurements and units
  • New calibration option for the Wireless CO2 Sensor
  • Firmware update for SmartCart fixing a time shift between Acceleration from Position sensor and measured Acceleration-x
  • New, larger readout for the Digits display

Windows Update

Mac Update

Making the leap from circuit diagrams to functioning circuits has never been so clear or intuitive. Circuits can be easily built and tested enticing students to more thoroughly explore the behavior of electricity. Your students will no longer be frustrated trying to trace out the electrical pathway through a nest of wires.

Supports inquiry learning – circuits can be easily modified and be quickly swapped out and rearranged

Compatible with both traditional and computer based labs – works with PASCO’s sensors as well as traditional Volt and Ammeters

Classroom management is a breeze – Storage is made simple with the included
Grattenels case and nesting trays

  • The 8 cm by 8 cm modules ensure that all students in a group can clearly see the completed circuit
  • Physical Components (resistors, batteries, switches, etc.) with identifying electronic symbols are visible on the surface of the modules
  • At a glance errors in a circuit can be quickly found without checking each connection

The Basic Kit includes enough modules to do 5 basic experiments:
  • Ohm’s Law
  • Series/Parallel Circuits
  • Batteries & Bulbs Circuits
  • Switches/Open/Closed Circuits
  • Electric Power & Energy

The Advanced Kit includes the Wireless Current & Voltage Sensors and modules for 7 additional experiments:
  • Kirchoff’s Laws
  • Electromagnets
  • Electromagnetic Induction
  • RC & RL circuits
  • Variable Resistance
  • LED Circuits
  • Electric Motors
  • 1
  • 2
  • 4

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  • A big thanks for all the help and support you provided – I want to take some time to say a big thanks for all the help and support you provided me to select the best equipment in order to make the best possible use of the funds available. It is really exceptional that you happily connected with me multiple times even during the weekend and was always motivated to help. Please accept my big thanks for this.

    Gurpreet Sidhu | Physics Instructor | University College of North | The Pas, MB

  • Wireless Spectrometer Big Hit With Students – PASCO’s wireless spectrometer has been utilized very well by our earth science and physical science teachers. It’s an excellent piece of equipment and we have very much enjoyed its addition to enriching our classroom. It definitely brings students to a higher level of understanding wave interaction at a molecular level.

    Matt Tumbach | Secondary Instructional Technology Leader | Tommy Douglas Collegiate | Saskatoon, SK

  • Excellent Smart Cart – I thought the cart was excellent. The quick sampling rate for force will be very useful for momentum and collision labs we do. I’m recommending we include this in our order for next school year.

    Reed Jeffrey | Science Department Head | Upper Canada College | Toronto ON

  • Your lab equipment is of the highest quality and technical support is always there to help. During the 25 years we have used a wide array of lab equipment including computer interfacing. Your Pasco line has a high profile in our lab and will continue to do so far into the future.

    Bob Chin | Lab Technician | Kwantlen Polytechnic University | Surrey, BC

  • Datalogging Activities are Cross-Curricular

    Throughout the province of Nova Scotia, PASCO’s probeware technology has been merged with the rollout of the new P-6 curriculum. We chose a number of sensors for use with our project-based activities. Both the functionality and mobility of PASCO’s dataloggers enable students to collect authentic, real-world data, test their hypotheses and build knowledge.

    What we find important to a successful implementation and adoption by teachers is showing that the probes are not a ‘standalone technology’. The datalogging activities are very cross-curricular and can incorporate math, english, science, and geography outcomes.

    We are excited to learn more about PASCO’s new weather sensor because our students enjoy projects where they can share and compare their data with weather stations from around the world and be part of a global community.

    Mark Richards | Technology Integration Consultant | Annapolis Valley R.S.B. | Nova Scotia

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